EAC Art Awards – blog from John Galvin 20/07/14

With only one full day left to vote for this year’s People’s Choice Award (PCA), and with privileged access to more information than you can easily find on our Art Awards website, I’m writing to encourage visitors to the blog who haven’t yet voted for the PCA to consider doing so.

As last year, there is a fierce fight going on between 3 contenders who have led the field for some time. But there are a number of competitors not too far behind. So as not to give too much away, I won’t quote their scores, or even which art works, but just list them alphabetically by name. They are:

  • Colin Bamber
  • James Harton
  • Tom Hawkes
  • Diana Hudson
  • Janette Morier
  • Jackie Pearce

To the entrants, of course, your comments on their work may matter more than whether they win a prize. So I’d encourage you to also to think of submitting a supportive comment to any artists whose work you appreciate even if you haven’t voted for them.

In all, 653 art works out of the 1,600 or so submitted this year have received your votes to date, and 329 have attracted comments.

And just a mention for an Art Awards constituency that we at EAC have a special affinity for, and that is older artists who work collaboratively to produce group works in day centres, classes and clubs. Stones End Day Centre Group is one of these, and local to us in London . Although at present it looks unlikely that they will win a PCA, Day Care Manager Chris Mikata is keen for the art group, and other users of the Day Centre, to have the opportunity to see what other amateur artists have produced, and we’re going to prepare some kind of local exhibition for them. This is their own creation, entitled ‘Reflection’.

'Reflection', by Stones End Day Centre Group

‘Reflection’, by Stones End Day Centre Group

Guest Blog from Val Kenyon

Although having loved art at school, when I left in 1963 life took over and I didn’t pick up a paintbrush again until 2001. After taking early retirement on health grounds and feeling very low, my daughter encouraged me to start painting again and bought me a set of watercolours for Christmas. I have been passionate about my art ever since.I am very lucky in that I live in a thriving artistic community who all help and inspire each other. Central Arts, Alloa Art Club and Resonate, a great arts, craft and education centre, have all helped me tremendously on my artistic journey.

 I paint an eclectic mix of works mostly in watercolour, pastels and oils, and more recently coloured pencils which help satisfy my love of detail. My photographer daughter constantly challenges me with her more unusual photos saying “here, paint that! “  which resulted in, amongst others, this painting, a diptych entitled “Balancing Act” and a pastel “Spiders in the Woodshed” 

'Balancing Act'

‘Balancing Act’

'Spiders in the Woodshed'

‘Spiders in the Woodshed’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I find watercolour the hardest and most frustrating medium to use so I’m forever trying different styles as can be seen in “White Lilies” and the gouache painting “Kinloch Castle Gardens” 

'White Lilies@

‘White Lilies’

Kinloch Castle Gardens

   ”Kinloch Castle Gardens’

 

Lastly, my favourite of all mediums, soft pastel. My entry “Ol’ Blue Eyes” was painted in this and was one of those very rare pieces of work that didn’t cause me any angst as it just seemed to flow right from beginning to end. I just wish this happened a little more often!  I met this cat whilst on holiday last year  on the Isle of Lewis and was so struck by her amazing blue eyes I just knew I had to try and paint her. Another sample of my favourite medium is ‘Dougal, Dandelions and Daisies’

'Ol' Blue Eyes'

‘Ol’ Blue Eyes’

'Dougal, Dandelions and Daisies'

‘Dougal, Dandelions and Daisies’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would like to see more of my art work, you can find me on www.valkenyon.co.uk

Guest Blog by Josiane Dowek

My taste for painting only started after I finished my studies when I joined an evening art class which I enjoyed very much. I was living in Egypt then, and all this was interrupted suddenly in 1956 when we had to leave after the Suez Canal crisis. I was just married then and resettled in England to start a new life. It was difficult and there was no time left for leisure so my penchant for art was forgotten.

It was only 3 years ago when I moved to Brighton and joined an art class locally that my taste for art resurfaced. Of course, I have more time on my hands. I adore painting landscapes, also people. My cousin brought me some photographs of people in India after a trip there, and I had some old ones from Egypt as well as many memories, all of which has inspired me.

IMG_6820 (Copy)final

IMG_6832 (Copy)finalI love to discover new facial expressions and features. I also love to use children as my subjects, often producing portraits of my 5 grandchildren. I also love looking at people in motion as well as dancers, this can be seen in my painting ‘Snowball Fight’.

Since I have been living in Brighton, I have been exposed to many things such as the homeless community. I was very interested to capture their expressions. For example, my granddaughter took a photograph of a Big Issue seller, and I decided to reproduce the photograph using different methods taught at my art class. For this piece, I first coated the paper with thick wall filler before using pastel and acrylic paints on top which I applied using paintbrushes, combs and sponges. This gave it a particularly striking texture.

My landscape paintings, View of the Lake and Flower Garden in Spring, I was influenced by the pointillism used by Seurat and worked intricately using watercolour paints. For The View of the Lake I was more inspired by the techniques used by impressionist painters such as Monet.

IMG_6829 (Copy)final

Art has been a very important part of my later years, and I am very glad and honoured to see the interest that has been expressed towards my artwork.

By Josiane Dowek

 

‘Hiding’ by Jackie Pearce

I started drawing with charcoal in a big way in 2004 after I had broken a rib.  Standing for hours rigorously painting in oils on large canvases was far too painful even to contemplate, but I could manage to sit and draw.

Gradually I found that what I really enjoyed and found deeply therapeutic was drawing emotion.  Drawing emotive people, particularly vulnerable children, sympathetically became an important part of my work.  My intention was to convey their emotions, until a fellow Artist pointed out that in fact I was also conveying my own.

'Alone'

‘Alone’

My daughter, during her travels, would send me photographs of interesting faces, all with a story to tell. I sometimes used those as a base for my drawings.  The two small boys in my entry for this year’s EAC awards were based on one of those photographs.  I should have called the drawing ‘In Hiding’ which conveys to the viewer much more about the emotions of the small boys, who were living in exceptionally poor conditions.

A Mother's Concern

A Mother’s Concern

My own life has been turned upside down during the past two years with several close family members being diagnosed with ill health. Therefore I think the emotions in Hiding became about fear and uncertainty for the future for me, my family and the two small boys.

Out of Conflict

Out of Conflict

'Sorrow'

‘Sorrow’

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to Jackie Pearce for supplying this blog for EAC Art Awards. You can view her work ‘Hiding’ in the EAC People’s Choice Award gallery, and find out more about her and her work  using the following links:

www.facebook.com/ShedArtUK        www.saatchiart.com/JackiePearce                  www.shedart.co.uk

A celebration of artists

Pintar Rapido London 2014

I thought of you this morning! There was a programme about an art event which will be happening in London on the 19th and 20th July. It’s called Pintar Rapido – rapid painting. Maybe you heard the item – it was on radio 4….It looks great fun. Their web site is at http://www.pintarrapido.com/london/ It’s about artists of all levels getting out and painting together. Then everyone gets to show – and sell – their work if they want to. A kind of ‘peoples’ choice’ but without the selection process! It made me think that maybe groups, for example in community settings, could do something similar even if they don’t meet regularly. There’s a film on their web site with people of all ages taking part…

“Pintar Rapido London is the UK’s biggest outdoor painting competition and exhibition. A weekend celebration of art and the London cityscape. It is open to professional and non professional artists of all skill levels and it inspires hundreds of them to create a painting from start to finish in a day. The following day the public can view and buy these unique visions of London at affordable prices, with 10% of the money raised going to charity.”